A Late Winter Walk at Mt Tomah

The Blue Mountains Botanic Gardens at Mt Tomah are well worth a visit at any time of the year. Deciding on a late winter visit, I wondered if it was too soon to spot any spring colour. But there were natural delights at every turn.

Delicate petals unfurl
Delicate petals unfurl

These flowers are at the entrance near the car park. After days of rain they were full of the promise of blue skies and warmer times ahead.

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)
Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

The gardens are alive with birds. New Holland honeyeaters swoop and pull at the native plants. Wattlebirds call and crimson rosellas whistle and chirp. In many parts of the garden there is the cheerful, industrious chatter of superb fairy wrens. This one seemed to be looking for nest material.

Daffodils swaying in the breeze
Daffodils swaying in the breeze

There are some lovely open spaces in the garden. One part has been planted with masses of daffodils – irresistible and beautiful to see.

Camellia in bloom
Camellia in bloom

In different parts of the garden there were still many camellias in bloom. This one took my breath away.

Bee enjoying grevillea
Bee enjoying grevillea

The garden has different sections for different vegetation. The Australian native plant sections were alive with bees and butterflies.

Australian Painted Lady butterfly
Australian Painted Lady butterfly

There is an extensive area with proteas and plants from Africa. Can you spot the butterfly?

Californian redwood
Californian redwood

Woodlands are represented in different parts of the garden. The sheer size of some of the trees is humbling.

Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides)
Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides)

On previous visits I’ve noticed Australian ravens near the kiosk area. This one came up to say hello.

Grass at Blue Mountains Botanic Garden
Grass at Blue Mountains Botanic Garden

For all the vibrant colour and beauty, I also like the simplicity of grass, rippling in the wind.

Variegated Tulip Tree bud
Variegated Tulip Tree bud

But the image that will stay with me are the branches of deciduous trees, knotted with bulbs, getting ready to welcome spring.

You can find out more about the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden here, and some of my previous visits as well.

What signs of the change of season have you spotted lately?

[Photo: Australian Painted Lady butterfly on blossom]

8 thoughts on “A Late Winter Walk at Mt Tomah

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